Fight Speeding Ticket

Most people try to fight speeding ticket fines by all sorts of means: that is a fact. For instance, one major argument is that the police officer did not agree to show the radar reading. Well, there is no law that says he / she has to. Moreover, a radar reading will not necessarily convince you that you were exceeding speed limits; the reading could very well be from another car, and you have no means to tell the difference, not on the spot at least. There is another trick here that may not help you fight speeding ticket penalties: what if you were shown the reading? The officer could very well put this aspect down in the papers with the mention that you “agreed” with the charge.

One other argument people bring when they fight speeding ticket penalties is that the police officer was rude to them. Normally speaking, he or she has no right to mistreat you; however, if you didn't watch in the rear mirror and he or she had to follow you for several miles before pulling you over, chances are that he or she will be fuming. Even so, you should be treated decently; yet, if you want to file a complaint it is better not to do it before you appear in court. The details of the day when you were stopped may also help you fight speeding ticket charges more easily.

If the police officer did not write everything in his / her papers, chances are that you will face less difficulties when you fight speeding ticket charges in court. In case there is not much written about your breaking the traffic rules, and you can also get a delay for the court hearing, it is most probable that the officer will not remember the case very well, since they stop dozens of cars every day. Time is therefore working to your advantage.

There are other legal escape doors for people who fight speeding ticket penalties in court. For instance, it is good to know whether the radar was located on private or public property. In case it was on private property your speeding ticket would be legal only if the police officer had a written consent from the owner of the property. Yet, certain laws are not always applicable to police officers that are following suspects, since they are in the performance of their legal duties.