Recycle Wood

Recycling has become the most general world-wide issue of public interest over the last decades, as alarmingly high pollution levels and weather changes made everybody think about saving good materials from being thrown away. Specialists claim that, in two hundred years, men cut down 95% of the old forests. So, it was definitely high time to recycle wood and find new ways to do so.

Extravagant architects and homeowners, designers and builders are following a new direction that could save thousands of acres of forest. They try reusing reclaimed wood for its special looks and quality. More than 45 millions board feet of reclaimed wood are being sold just in the United States while ten years ago the figure barely reached 7.5 million. It's obvious that the idea to recycle wood grew stronger every year.

Numbers are encouraging as every million board feet of recycle lumber replaces one thousand acres of forest that should have been cut. This program to recycle wood goes beyond the idea of making a profit, it's the pleasure of mixing ecology with industry.

Most of the reclaimed wood is of a higher quality than anything you'd get on the market today. Reclaimed timber is air dried and is also seasoned to a good condition. Its color varies from golden brown to gray, making it perfect for building a room with a historical aspect.

Despite the fact that recycle wood ideas are inspiring we must be aware that not every one of us is able to work with recycled timber, and not all wood is reclaimable. Materials need to be handled with extra care and installed with attention.

Untrained builders may not realize which type wood can be used and which not, and this confusion is triggered by the similar evidence of reuse. Furthermore, some materials are rare, and once used there is no other for corrections or improvements; under such circumstances the architect should be familiar with proper knowledge to offer alternative solutions.

Recycle wood companies usually offer very hard essences of timber that has a much higher quality and resistance than any other wood variety on the market; its price varies depending on hardness and quality. Good timber was in the past what steel is in our modern society, this is why most of the old forests disappeared. Deforestation was a massive phenomenon of the 19th century when cities were expanded and new land was claimed for agricultural purposes.