GUITAR CHORDS

Guitar chords are a collection of tones that sound together at a time when played on a guitar. These chords are set up on the guitar in such a way that they can be optimally used for many playing styles. The notes composed can be composed with the guitar chords. Unlike other musical instruments, a guitar is flexible for chording purposes. Many chords can play the same notes on the fret board.

Guitar chords are represented in a chord diagram format for the players. Several symbols are used to identify the diagram.

* The vertical lines represent the guitar strings and the line on the left shows the sixth string on the guitar.

* The horizontal lines show frets on the guitar.

* A symbol x is shown above a vertical line that indicate a string not played.

* A symbol o is above a vertical line that indicates an open string.

* To show a position in which a string is played the filled circle or square represents it.

* A curved line is used t o indicate a bare

* There are numbers beneath each string that shows the index finger and the middle finger.

A guitar player needs to change the low E string tuning to a D note. The guitar chords change place between strings.

The major guitar chords are a root note, a note, a major third above the root and a fifth above the root. These five chords are very important to a guitar as they are all major triads and they refer to chords. Another reason is that they area available in open position and the first three frets open strings. These five chords have its root on a different string. They can be connected and linked to create one large pattern of tones on the fret board.

There are two completely tone major chords, they are of B major and F major, and they are played as bare chords. The effect is that the barre chords act as if the guitar has been shortened like a movable nut. Barre chords in the shape of A and E major can be played on the fret board. These chords are considered as major because they have its shape and they determine the intervals between the notes.

Minor chords noted as C, CM, OR CMIN are also the same as the major chords only that they have a minor third instead of a major third. This difference is of one semi tone. Augmented chords and diminished chords can also be created.

A guitar chord can be reversed when the bass note is not the root note. The chords are extended to seventh, ninths, elevenths and thirteenths also. These all are played with the CAGED shapes.

There are also power chords that consist solely of a root note and a fifth. It is possible to play five power chord shapes in a guitar that have six strings. Many alternate tunings are there and these change the way of the chords played making it easier to play. If all six strings are tuned to play a chord then a guitar is openly tuned without fretting. This enables the player to bar every fret of the guitar to make a chord.